A Philosophinity analysis of: Cold War literature

This is a comparative analysis of Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, John Le Carré’s The Spy Who Came in From the Cold, and Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange.

Among the many texts that shape a contemporary understanding of the ways of thinking prevalent during the Cold War era, three in particular have emerged as the indisputable bastions of a zeitgeist characteristic of an intensified questioning of humanity, its beliefs, and values. This article considers the influence, in portraying diverse perspectives on scientific, religious, philosophical, political and economic ways of thinking, that Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, John Le Carré’s The Spy Who Came in From the Cold, and Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange yield in shaping an understanding of the era, decades after their compositions.

Continue reading “A Philosophinity analysis of: Cold War literature”

Advertisements

The Brooding Flag: A Cold War short story

This story was written for a creative writing task for HSC English Extension: After the Bomb.

“Men and women of Ironerica!” he announced, standing tall at the helm of some wondrous podium. “Today, as our country flies along the plains of this century’s greatest events, we enter a new epoch,” he began, “An epoch that will be remembered in the great frozen space that is human history, as a discernible, marked flicker.”

The masses looked up, as the wind blew their hair and long, thin coats in a south-westerly direction. It was a cool, winter day. While the clouds above moved in a dark, grey, and brooding torpor, the wind of change had passed by, like a torrent of water passing over the feeble branches of trees with boles hollow to the core.

Continue reading “The Brooding Flag: A Cold War short story”